What Strings Do We Use?

It was a dark and stormy night and the wind was blowing from the north with the fury of an Alaskan gale. The heavy rain was blowing almost sideways. I snugged up the collar on my Gore-Tex lined jacket. Amazing, no matter how hard the wind blew the elements were simply unable to penetrate, yet the jacket's Gore-Tex membrane allowed vapor to pass so I did not feel sweaty while running to get to the safety of my cabin.

I burst through the door and collapsed inside, safe and dry. I knew what my next move must be. It was something to insure my very survival before retiring for the evening. I must floss my teeth. Flossing is something mountain men don't usually like to do because it can hurt but not anymore thanks to Glide dental floss invented by the Gore Corporation. It is a slick dental floss that "glides" easily between the teeth. It can make dental hygiene easy and fun--almost. Both of these products are the result of Teflon technology and they really do make life easier.

All right, now that I am safe and warm and have a dazzling smile it is now time to re-string the Anderson guitar for the next gig. You have probably guessed that Gore also offers guitar strings? They are called Elixir. Well let's think about this for a moment. Teflon for protective clothing and dental floss is one thing but putting it on my guitar strings just doesn't seem right or does it? I think we expected a coated string to have a duller tone. Well there is only one way to know for sure, let's try them.

So that is just what we did here at Tom Anderson's (mountain cabin) Guitarworks. We restrung and went out to play and we were very surprised. They sound great, really great. They sound like fresh strings that have been played-in for 20 minutes, or so, to get rid of that first initial brassy/bright quality. They retain that "broken-in" new string tone for a month or maybe more. The feel is smooth and fast with a bit less finger noise. We have a test unit here, a Butterscotch Hollow T Classic with alder body and maple neck, that has the same set of Elixir Strings that we put on at least two months ago. Many hands play this guitar and it still sounds quite good. Tom has been gigging and is in love with these strings and many good players that we have shared our findings with have tried them with the same results.

After all this real-world testing, we are thrilled to be shipping Tom Anderson Guitars with Elixir strings. After our experience, how could we not? Not only will they stay fresh in the store so when you try an Anderson the strings won't sound lifeless but you may also find you'll love them for recording and gigs because they are so much less sensitive to loss of brightness. How many times have you been in the recording studio, using your guitar on track after track and all of a sudden your strings lose their clarity. You quickly have to change only to have them too brash sounding for the track and you wish you had time to "play them in." Now there is a string that you really don't have to worry about.

Try them and see how you like them and let's all try to floss a bit more-but not with the guitar strings